repurpose

donations 101

Once you've purged, it's helpful to know which organizations locally need which specific items. It's empowering to know your donation is going to a purposeful cause and is serving your local community. We've put together this resource of where to donate specific items!

Household Items-
KARM: drop off and pick up available
Ladies of Charity
Angelic Ministries

Antiques, vintage furniture & historic building materials-
Salvage Shop

Clothing & accessories-
bare.Thred: Exciting things ahead... Be on the lookout for information regarding donations on June 1. They repurpose clothes and aim to reduce clothing waste in Knoxville! 

Bikes-
Kickstand
DreamBikes

Medical Equipment- 
East Tennessee Technology Access Center

Books-
Friends of the Knox County Library

Arts & Craft Supplies-
The Basement Community Arts Studio

Eyeglasses-
The Lions Club
Volunteer Ministry Center

Construction & Building Material-
Habitat for Humanity

Please share other specific donation spots in Knoxville that you know of! 

*Blog Image from Native Maps

Garden Shed organizing round up

Image from  archilovers.com

Image from archilovers.com

Spring is right around the corner and we've gathered some tips from around the web to help you purge, organize, and restock your garden shed. Sometimes it's hard to find the motivation to get a jump start on your yard and garden plots but having an inspiring potting shed definitely makes it easier. If you don't have a shed, think about possibly creating a gardening/lawn maintenance corner in your garage.


 

 

1. There is nothing worse than rusted, dull gardening tools. To keep tools sharp and shiny, try storing them in a sand filled bucket or clay pot and mix in a little bit of oil. Your tools will be well kept and easy to grab on the go.

 

 


Image from  bhg.com

Image from bhg.com

 

 

2. Be resourceful. Think outside of the box and repurpose items you already have. Use a chick feed as a shelf, use an old shutter as a shelf, mount old rusted tools to the wall to hang things from. Once you start thinking creatively you'll find you have all kinds of things you could probably put to good use.

 

 


Image from  bhg.com

Image from bhg.com

 

 

 

3. To help keep track of when to plant what, try displaying your seeds by month. We love this idea of using ribbons and clothes pins. Seed packets are so pretty it's like displaying informal art.

 

 


Image and tutorial from  Turtles and Tails

Image and tutorial from Turtles and Tails

 

 

 

4. If you have limited space and you're sharing real estate in a garage, use this handy pull down table to create space for potting plants when you need it.


Image and tutorial by  Instructables

Image and tutorial by Instructables

 

5. Need seating and storage as well? This step-by-step tutorial walks you through how to create these tasteful and useful benches when storage is limited.

 

 

HYD hopes these ideas give you reason to get outside, get a little dirt under your nails, and enjoy the spring that's on it's way!

Home as an offering

We sat down this week to interview the lovely Lindsay Heath about her house, her decorating style, and her philosophy on home. If you've never met Lindsay, the best way I know to describe her is that her presence feels like a warm hug.

Honestly, to focus on Lindsay's decorating style and her home in it's purely physical sense would be a disservice. Lindsay has a natural eye for creating beauty but what struck me the most about our visit was the overwhelming sense that when you walk into her home, the pressure is off, you are invited, welcomed, and appreciated.

With a knack for quirky items and for the cast off's of both friends and strangers, Lindsay and her husband Jonny have created a patchwork home that incorporates the practical, lovely, and eclectic parts of life in every sense. One thing Lindsay said that I've been thinking about a lot is that "space is defined by the people who inhabit it and use it". With a desire to make the people around her feel more important than the things she surrounds herself with, she aims for making spaces feel touchable and approachable; like you can enjoy yourself without having to worry about your surroundings. She mentioned that over the years she has come to find that an object can evoke a memory but that she doesn't have to retain the object in order for the memory to continue. Lindsay loves the creative aspect of decorating with objects that can be repurposed or reimagined. She loves finding unwanted objects and looking at them in a new way... kind of like when you find a house that's about to be demolished so you pick it up and move it two blocks over to save it... yes... she actually did that!!! (more on that at a later date) She shared with us that many, if not most of the things, in her house have been given to her and she in turn passes things along when she no longer has the space or need for them.

Lindsay is the first renter we have interviewed and we were especially interested in what she had to say about decorating a rental. Upon moving into their home they were asked not to paint or hang large things on the wall. As a result, Lindsay has used her limitations to find creative ways to dwell and make the space feel like home. Large art pieces lean against the walls, thumb tacks or Velcro strips are used for lighter objects. Lindsay has found that sometimes limits help you see things in new ways, limits force you to think creatively.

We asked Lindsay what "home" means to her and she mentioned the end of a stanza in the daily reading in the book of common prayer. It reads, "May the peace of the Lord Christ go with you: wherever he may send you; may he guide you through the wilderness: protect you through the storm; may he bring you home rejoicing: at the wonders he has shown you; may he bring you home rejoicing: once again into our doors." The lines resonate with Lindsay in that to her, home is a place to welcome people in from the weariness, from the pace of the world.

"Home is a place for gathering and celebrating and for relaxing and eating: the really elemental practices. Home is the hub of human activity. The way that we relate in homes can be so formative- be it through decoration, presentation of food, accessibility to objects.  Our relation to all those things that make us human make up a home; a place that can encapsulate all of the best parts of human life. "

Another unique thing about Lindsay and Jonny is that since they were married, they have always lived with other people- sometimes other married couples, sometimes single folks, but always someone. We asked her to tell us a little bit more about that decision. "On a practical level, when we got married, it made sense financially to share the expenses with others along with the fellowship, the space, the being known and knowing. The incidental disciplines and sacrifices of being not as able to hide the things that as humans we are tempted to hide and the discomfort of sharing space have been an unexpected and challenging reward. With the different people we’ve lived with, we always sit down and talk about all the reasons to live together, economic, practical, division of labor, fun -- but the primary reason we share a home with people is to become more like Christ. It’s been a very consistent practical way to be challenged and to challenge others in the comings and goings of every day life. Living with others creates a lot of opportunities to do that hard work. It has been a great way to keep in check the temptation to hold onto things tightly. Living with others is often inconvenient but there is an ethic of being uncomfortable that I’ve found to be a wonderful crucible-- that’s been a refinement of my walk towards Christ."